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03 My next slide

Page history last edited by Béatrice H. Alves 11 years, 8 months ago

 

3. My next slide shows…

 


 

 

3.1   Introducing visuals

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Let’s now look at the next slide which shows…

To illustrate this, let’s have a closer look at…

The chart on the following slide shows…

I have a picture here that shows…

The problem is illustrated on the next slide…

According to this graph, …

You can see in this table. ...

Can everybody see this?

As you can see from the graph…

I'd like to draw your attention to…

 

 

3.1.1   Introducing a visual

In context

  • As you can see from this graph, our daily production is increasing.
  • I'd like to start off by showing you the latest figures for quality controls.
  • I'll just go back to the last slide.
  • Let's have a look at this bar chart.
  • The first graph, here, shows our number of accidents
  • The next slide shows the decrease in productivity.

 

 

3.1.2  Drawing attention to visuals

In context

§         Can everybody see the poster?

§         Can you see at the back?

§         Have a quick look at the pie chart.

§         I'd like to draw your attention to this diagram.

§         Let's have a more detailed look at the photograph.

In the Tips Section you will find some hints on how to  prepare your visual aids

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3.2  Saying numbers

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400,000 = four hundred thousand (no s plural)
450, 360 = four hundred and fifty thousand (and) three hundred and sixty

Numbers less than 1: .792 =: point seven nine two

Fractions: ½ = one half - 1/3 = one third - ¼ = one quarter -
 1/5 = one fifth - 1/ 6 = one sixth etc - 3/5 = three fifths

Percentage: 1.5% = one point five percent

Ratios: 2:1 = two to one

Ordinal numbers: first (1st), second (2nd), third (3rd), fourth (4th),
fifth, twenty-second (22nd), the thirty-first etc.

Dates: 1871 = eighteen seventy-one -
2009 = two thousand and nine

 

 

 

 

Numbers, especially long ones, are often difficult for the audience to understand. Try to say numbers slowly and clearly, and point at them while speaking.

 

2m

2 milion

1.6 bn

one point six billion

1/3

one-third

¾

three-quarters

235m²

two hundred and thirty-five square meters

98%

ninety-eight per cent

€150,000

one hundred and fifty thousand euro(s)

17 m²

seventeen square meters

35 m³

thirty-five cubic meters

Remember that:

1.        we use a comma in English to show thousands and a point to show the decimal place.

2.       we say ‘2 million’ or ’10 billion’ (NOT 2 millions / 10 billions)

3.       we say ‘2 million dollars’, ‘170 pounds’ (NOT 2 million dollar / 170 pound, NOR 2 million of dollars)

4.       we NEVER read the numbers after the point as one number (e.g. NEVER: point seven hundred and ninety two)

In the Tips Section you will find more practice on saying and listening to numbers

 

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3.3  Emphasizing important points

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I’d like to stress / highlight / emphasize the following point(s).

I’d like to start by drawing your attention to….

Let me point out that…

I think you’ll be surprised to see that…

I’d like you to focus your attention on…

Let’s look more closely at…

What’s really important here is…

What I’d like to point out here is…

completely -  totally - extremely - absolutely – obviously - ideally
incredibly – highly – surprisingly
far too -  enough - quite

so - such 

3.3.1  Highlighting information

In context

§         As far as we are concerned, the staff will keep using the CAD system.

§         Basically, what this means is we have to lay off 30 workers.

§         I’d like to highlight that the power loss has become worse over several weeks.

§         I’d like to start by drawing your attention to the computer equipment required.

§         Let’s look more closely at the turnover that rose sharply last month.

§         What I mean is, we have to react quickly.

 

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3.3.2  Emphasizing

In context

§         Frankly, our competitors are in trouble.

§         I should emphasize that more floor space will be required.

§         I'd like to point out that only one other company does this.

§         I'd like to stress the importance of the intercultural dimension.

 

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3.3.3  Emphasizing by using questions

In context

§         How are we to react to this trend?

§         How will this affect us?

§         What are the benefits?

§         What is the alternative?

§         What should we be doing?

§         What will happen if we let this trend continue?

§         What, in fact, does this mean?

§         Why has this happened?

 

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3.3.4  Emphasizing by using adverbs and adjectives

In context

§         Because of the extremely high cost of producing this article, we have to drop it.

§         It is totally unsuitable for metals.

§         It just isn't good enough.

§         It would be completely wrong to change our strategy at this point.

§         It’s such a strong fiber that it is used in bulletproof vests.

§         It's so difficult to avoid altering the material.

§         The markup price is far too high.

§         We found the first option totally unacceptable.

§         We're absolutely convinced that sales will pick up.

§         We're quite sure that we'll win the bid.

On so and such, see the grammar study guide

 

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3.4  Expressing Connections

3.4.1   Expressing purpose

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… (in order) to ….

The purpose of … is to …

Our aim is to…

… so (that)…

In context

§         Our aim was to reduce costs.

§         The purpose of this step is to expand foreign markets.

§         They took this decision so that the order could be delivered in time.

§         We did this in order to regain investor confidence.

 

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3.4.2  Expressing cause

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What’s the reason for …?

This was caused by / due to…

Because of…

Thanks to…

This is (the reason) why…

 

 

In context

§         Because of their intuitive operation, waterjets are easy to use.

§         Thanks to a simple control system, we were able to produce more quickly.

§         This is due to repetitive strikes in the industry.

§         This is the reason for applying pressure.

§         This is why it became such a popular cutting option.

 

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3.4.3  Expressing consequence

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As a consequence / Consequently,…

As a result / So,…

It resulted in…

This has led to…

In context

§         As a result, mechanical fixings were abandoned.

§         Consequently, the joint will need to be disconnected.

§         Our new strategy has led to an increase of 10%.

§         So, we've had to change our policy.

§         This resulted in high quality standard.

 

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3.4.4  Expressing contrast and opposition

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… but

… whereas, while

In contrast, …

On (the) one hand, … On the other hand, …

Unlike

although, despite the fact that

however, nevertheless

despite, in spite of

In context

§         On one hand, sales have increased. On the other hand, profit has fallen.

§         Production is efficient whereas the logistics department is slow.

§         Unlike our competitors, we insist on offering high quality.

§        

 

§         Although maintenance work had been done, the system failed.

§         In spite of its weight, it’s surprisingly easy to handle.

§         We are going through difficult times. However, training courses are being offered.

 

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3.4.5  Expressing conditions

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If …, - Only if…

Even if …

Unless …

Otherwise

Provided (that)…

As long as…

In context

§         As long as demand grows, we shouldn't need to reduce our staff.

§         Even if you plunge it into water, it won’t stop because it’s waterproof.

§         Everything should run smoothly unless management changes its mind again.

§         If everyone makes an effort, we should pull through.

§         Provided there are no further hitches, everything should work.

§         We need to increase production; otherwise we won't meet our orders.

 

 

3.4.6 Explaining options

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The option is…

Either … or …

Another way…

We could also

Alternatively

Why don’t we…?

Why not…?

Couldn’t we…?

In context

§         Another way of dealing with the problem is to vary items according to seasonal changes.

§         Couldn’t we drill horizontally?

§         The alternative is discontinuing certain lines.

§         The first option would be to use some kind of glue.

§         We could also train more of the personnel.

§         We could either use a crane or drag.

§         We're faced with a difficult choice here.

§         Why not come up with a new way of applying pressure?

 

 

For more tools to express connections, see the grammar study guide

 

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Don't forget

to take a look at

the tips on visual aids.

 

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